Install Theme

Your web-browser is very outdated, and as such, this website may not display properly. Please consider upgrading to a modern, faster and more secure browser. Click here to do so.

TOPHAT GAMER

I play games, chances are so do you. Let's talk about it.
Sep 17 '14
chuylol:

Solaire of Astora
:Jolly Cooperation Intensifies:

chuylol:

Solaire of Astora

:Jolly Cooperation Intensifies:

803 notes (via vaatividya & chuylol)Tags: Praise the Sun! New Rule Imma reblog Solaire of Astora every goddamn time I see him Which luckily for you isn't often

Sep 14 '14

I give this game a bit of crap. It’s stealth gameplay is borderline broken, it’s visual design blends everything with everything else, and the characters aren’t the most likeable. Add to that the monumental pile of collectibles in each stage, minimising the actual worth of the damn things and more bugs than I care to remember, and yea, no, I’ve been giving this game a rough time. But it does do something that I didn’t expect. It actually surprised me.

I mean, the thing in question was probably too obvious to begin with. I just didn’t think there was enough thought put into this. Colour me wrong.

Tags: Gaming Video Games Games Murdered: Soul Suspect Lets Play

Sep 14 '14

Destiny

For about the past two years, Activision and Bungie have been heralding the arrival of the next big thing in gaming. Considering Bungie’s last big thing, these weren’t words to scoff at. But is this game truly destined for greatness? Awful puns aside, let’s take a look at Destiny.

Destiny box art.png

STORY

The universe of Destiny is set 700 or so years in the future, after an age of cosmic exploration and subsequent apocalypse, both brought on by the discovery of the enigmatic Traveller. It’s advanced technology brought with it an increase it knowledge and technology, facilitating humanity’s expedition skywards. But it was not without enemies; enemies who followed it to earth and brought an event known as The Collapse to reduce humanity to a single city, protected by the Traveller itself.

Playing as a Guardian (a being with immense light inside of them), it is up to you to ascend through the ranks of your chosen class and dispel the darkness that approaches to wipe out the remnants of life in the galaxy.

As epic as the story sounds, it’s a bit of a skeleton that needs some filling out. The setting is interesting, using pseudo-high fantasy combined with sci-fi technology to set it apart from your mass effects and the like. However, the actual narrative of the game lacks something. Call it what you will, but it’s hard to be invested in a game knowing that you’re one of thousands of guardians who could easily be taking your spot.

Another problem with the world building present in Destiny is that you either have to fill in the blanks yourself, or go to a completely different website to check out database entries. Poor storytelling is having to rely on that method to begin with, but even worse is making me go to an external source to figure it out.

PRESENTATION

Destiny’s art style is a surprisingly beautiful take on the apocalypse and the galaxy in general. We’ve seen Russia in games before, but somehow, the rust encrusted structures and bright blue skies make this incarnation of it one of my favourites. Some locations, such as Mars and the Moon are as expected, but Venus is a standout to me, with it’s caustic yet-tropical looking environment, complete with yellow space storm way off in the distance. Truly somewhere I don’t mind spending hours in in-game. That said, it would be nice to have more than four locations, and spending as much time as you do trekking these surprisingly linear paths does wear thin quite quickly.

Guardian armour provides a decent bit of variety, but as the game is primarily an FPS, you’ll only really see it well when you’re at the Tower base, or on your character screen. It’s hard not to see shades of Spartan armour in the Titan variations, but the Hunters and Warlocks have cool accessories that set them apart visually.

The enemy designs have to be the visual highlight for me, however. The four main factions (Fallen, Hive, Vex and Cabal) are all visually distinct, and all peaked my interest about their place in this world. However, as I said before, it’s hard to really get into the lore of Destiny when it’s not even presented in the game itself.

The score is excellent, providing the appropriate weight to each battle and just sucking you into the game in general. It’s voice acting is fine, with big name actors behind it, such as Peter Dinklage and Bill Nighy providing voices for the two main speakers in the game.

GAMEPLAY

As I mentioned briefly before, Destiny is primarily an FPS, with some MMORPG elements thrown in to create something somewhat new. It’s shooting mechanics fall somewhere between that of Halo, and the twitchier COD games, resulting in fast gunplay with less of a focus on realistic movement.

The weaponry in Destiny is varied, with main weapons coming in 3 different types of rifle and the hand cannon pistols. On top of these, you have special weapons, such as Shotguns, Sniper Rifles and Fusion Rifles. To round out the weapons that you can have on hand are the heavy weapons, the Heavy Machine Gun and the Rocket Launcher. These allow you to customise your loadout to be ready for any and all situations.

Part of it’s MMORPG feel is provided by the separate skill trees of the three different classes. The Titan is supposed to be the archetypal Warrior; it’s sub-trees can help you focus on Damage Dealing or Damage Taking, providing you with an AoE ground pound to take out groups of enemies in one fell swoop. The Warlock is the mage of the group, giving you access to long range damage dealing blasts, and the Hunter is the rogue, with it’s main special ability giving you a more focused, high damage weapon for a very short time.

As different as these classes sound, most of the skills in the tree provide very similar upgrades, be it stat increases or boosts to mobility. Changing up these perks doesn’t really feel necessary, and it feels pointless to be honest.

It’s MMO systems aren’t really explained too well in-game. There are a number of hidden vendors and foreign currencies to wade through to figure out what you can or can’t buy, and how to buy them when you can. For instance, to buy certain items from your class Vanguard, you need vanguard points and ranks, both earned from doing Strikes and patrol Missions. To buy crucible gear, you need to rank up in the PvP and accrue enough points in those as well. The faction gear functions in much the same way, but requires you wear a symbol of theirs to change the kind of levels and marks you get. And on top of that, there are people in game that sell you stuff for items that you get mainly through random drops. It’s not obvious until you look deeper into it, but it would be nice to know from the start.

As an Australian gamer, it was excellent to hear that Destiny would have local servers from day one. However, connection issues have run rampant since launch; one instance had me trying to enter the home base for a good half hour before it worked. Trying to maintain a connection with your friends can be Hell as well, and it caused many a rage quit.

To top it all off, it’s mission structure is repetitive to say the least. Story missions generally consist of walking to point A, having to protect Peter Dinklage for a good few minutes, and then if you’re lucky, you get to do that a second time and then maybe a boss fight. The strikes are just as bad, consisting of 2 mini bosses and enemy filled halls between them, finishing with a big boss fight with an obnoxiously large health bar. This is not difficulty. Having additional enemies spawn en masse is also not how difficulty works. These are basically big time sinks.

REPLAYABILITY

While the game’s base mechanics are polished and fun, it’s hard to say this is worth playing on and on like an MMO, because there’s a lack of actual PvE content variation. Every mission feels the same and it’s hard to get excited, especially when it calls for grinding patrol missions to get better gear. The PvP is fairly enjoyable, but there’s a distinct lack of maps, and it’s hard not to feel like the game is imbalanced when the only deaths you receive are from Shotguns, Heavy Weapons and super moves.

Expansions are on the way to provide more content, but until then, it’s a very repetitive game that lacks any enjoyable way of getting necessary things (like currency for gear).

OVERVIEW

At this stage, it’s hard to really recommend Destiny. It’s shooting mechanics are damn good, and fighting the well designed enemies in excellent locations is really enjoyable. But you can only do it for so long before the repetitive nature of Destiny really sets in. It has PvP and co-operative strikes to break up the tedium, but it only works for so long. As of right now, Destiny is a solid skeleton of a great game, but it’s clear that it’s missing something. Maybe I’ll come back in a few months to revisit this review, but as of right now, I would give it a pass unless you have a bunch of friends who are going in on it. Just remember, Fireteams are only 3-man at a time!

Next week, possibly a review of Disney Infinity 2.0, MARVEL EDITION! Yeeeeeaaaaaa!

GAME ONE!

Tophat Gamer

Tags: Gaming Video Games Games Destiny PS4 Xbox One

Sep 14 '14

tophat-gamer:

Odd. The titlecard above says 12, but it’s 11. Huh. THANKS YOUTUBE.

Anyway, we’re hot on the heels of the Bell Killer, and we get some ghostly visions of his super strength. Maybe one day he’ll be wrestling Chris Benoit in Hell.

*Cough*.

On closer inspection, zis appears to be an 11 after posting. Fuck you too tumblr. You asshole.

2 notes (via tophat-gamer)

Sep 14 '14

Odd. The titlecard above says 12, but it’s 11. Huh. THANKS YOUTUBE.

Anyway, we’re hot on the heels of the Bell Killer, and we get some ghostly visions of his super strength. Maybe one day he’ll be wrestling Chris Benoit in Hell.

*Cough*.

2 notes Tags: Gaming Video Games Games Murdered: Soul Suspect Lets Play

Sep 8 '14

skyllianblitz:

tophat-gamer:

I wonder how far away from finishing playthrough one of Dark Souls 2 I am. I’m getting the giant memories right now, so if anyone can give me some kind of idea, that’d be cool.

You have 1 area left.

Thanks! I ended up finishing last night =)

3 notes (via skyllianblitz & tophat-gamer)

Sep 7 '14

This game keeps surprising me with odd/bad design choices. Why would you hide a clue so far away from everything else, with none of the visual clues that the rest of them had. I mean, it’s so weird. And then when you’re forced to pick relevant clues, if you overthink it, you’re fucked!

AAAAAAAH it’s too late on a Sunday night for me to do this.

2 notes Tags: Gaming Video Games Games Murdered: Soul Suspect Lets Play

Sep 7 '14

Hotline Miami

While originally releasing on the PC back in 2012, Hotline Miami has had a resurgence lately with it’s re-release on the PS4. Having not reviewed it at the time of it’s original release, I figure now is as good a time as any. So how good is this game? And does the PS4 add anything of note? Let’s find out!

Hotline Miami cover.png

STORY

Taking place in 1989, the game places you in the Letterman Jacket of an unnamed man, often referred to by his aforementioned distinctive clothing, who is plagued by vivid, surreal visions of masked strangers passing judgement on his actions. Coinciding with this, he often receives phone messages; coded requests for him to murder certain subjects. 

The game doesn’t flow in the exact right chronological order, and it seems to employ a device known as the unreliable narrator (being “Jacket’s” visions), and the game even splits in it’s events around the halfway point. It’s a very weird story, with many of the details requiring some interpretation and some collectible hunting to get the “true” ending. I like the approach of not telling everything right from the start, but it can come off as being strange just for the sake of it.

PRESENTATION

The game’s top down, 2D presentation works well for the twin-stick shooter style of gameplay, but it’s really surprising to see such high impact ultra-violence in a game that doesn’t have the same graphical fidelity going for it as other games. But when you crack a guy over the head with a baseball bat, and you see him slowly crawl through the red and pink splatter you just caused, it’s hard not to cringe.

It’s style is perfect for the setting; it’s garish, vibrant, neon-soaked levels and white suit-wearing bad guys hits that iconic sweet spot for what you imagine when you think 80’s crime. And to add to that, the hypnotic bass and synthesiser soundtrack is ridiculously catchy and you’ll be lulled into a trance before you can say “Oh my god, that guys eyes just burst”.

It’s worth noting that the PS4 version uses it’s controller light and speaker in a neat (if unnecessary) way. When finishing a character off using the Six-Axis motion controls, the light violently flashes pink and red, while the speaker emits a very wet, meaty slam. It doesn’t sound like much as I describe it, but it’s a surprisingly gratifying act.

GAMEPLAY

Hotline Miami is categorised as a topdown shooter, and while that’s technically true, more often than not, you’ll be getting up close and personal with a melee weapon. You’ll be sent on missions to clear out buildings full of Russian mobsters, and you’ll most likely be heavily outnumbered and out-gunned.

Luckily, the controls are responsive, and the game is fast paced enough for you to close ground between you and your target quickly enough to kill before being killed. And if you fail in your attempt, well, the game loads back up nice and quickly, minimising downtime and letting you have another crack as soon as possible.

The variety of melee weapons is varied and generally they act in different ways. While most are one hit kills, the speed and efficiency with which they can clear a room is different for each weapon. The same variety applies to firearms, as Hotline Miami provides you with a range of shotguns, pistols and automatic rifles to take care of your dirty work.

Part of the difficulty of Hotline Miami is being so outmatched, and to balance things out, you’re encouraged to look around the map using some wider camera controls. Spotting enemies across rooms, or next to doorways can be invaluable information, as incapacitating one foe while you focus on another will save your ass from lead more often than you can imagine.

The game’s constant challenge and exceptionally fast pace keeps it’s fairly basic gameplay style from becoming noticeably repetitive, though that could also be in part due to it’s rather short length.

REPLAYABILITY

While the game is fun enough to want to pick it up again just for the sake of it, there are a few collectibles that provide some incentive to revisit Hotline Miami. They even unlock the true ending to the game. Lurking behind the credits is another (shorter) campaign, giving you control over another killer, but even with this, the game is pretty short.

OVERVIEW

If you haven’t played or picked up Hotline Miami before now, you should fix that. It’s a fast paced and addictive game, with surprisingly effective ultra-violence, despite it’s almost basic art style. While it is short, it’s also not being sold as a full prce retail release, and I’d say the asking price is more than worth it for this neon-soaked, ultra violent romp through the underbelly of 80’s Miami.

Next week, probably a review of Destiny.

GAME ON!

Tophat Gamer

2 notes Tags: Gaming Video Games Games Hotline Miami Indie Games Devolver Digital Dennaton Games

Sep 7 '14

This game had one thing going for it. A neat concept. Not a unique one, but definitely one that isn’t overused. But a neat concept only does so much for a game with clichéd environments, awful stealth and bugs throughout it’s entirety. 

Still good for a laugh though. Also, cat’s do not work that way.

1 note Tags: Lets Play Gaming Murdered: Soul Suspect Video Games Youtube

Sep 7 '14

I wonder how far away from finishing playthrough one of Dark Souls 2 I am. I’m getting the giant memories right now, so if anyone can give me some kind of idea, that’d be cool.

3 notes Tags: Dark Souls 2 Gaming